Bombshell: Trump Vindicated By New Study On Hydroxychloroquine That’s Driving Liberals Nuts

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by Sarah Foster

A bombshell medical study is showing that the media and Democrats’ relentless, politically-based attacks on the drug hydoxychloroquine may have cost the lives of many Americans and others around the world.

That’s because researchers have found that early administration of the hydroxychloroquine can actually make patients substantially less likely to die of COVID-19.

But the media has blasted the drug for months, ever since — and only because — it was touted by President Donald T. Trump.

Ironically, today it was CNN itself that was first to publicize the shocking story:

A study conducted by the Henry Ford Health System in Southeast Michigan has been published and cited in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases.

The study shows that hydroxychloroquine provided a “66% hazard ratio reduction.”

“Our results do differ from some other studies,” Dr. Marcus Zervos, who heads the hospital’s infectious diseases unit, said at a news conference. “What we think was important in ours … is that patients were treated early. For hydroxychloroquine to have a benefit, it needs to begin before the patients begin to suffer some of the severe immune reactions that patients can have with COVID.”

This despite relentless attacks on both Trump and the drug, in hundreds of hours of biased coverage:

The Trump campaign reveled in the success of the “fantastic news.”

“Fortunately, the Trump Administration secured a massive supply of hydroxychloroquine for the national stockpile months ago,” a statement read. “Yet this is the same drug that the media and the Biden campaign spent weeks trying to discredit and spread fear and doubt around because President Trump dared to mention it as a potential treatment for coronavirus.”

“The new study from the Henry Ford Health System should be a clear message to the media and the Democrats: stop the bizarre attempts to discredit hydroxychloroquine to satisfy your own anti-Trump agenda. It may be costing lives.

That statement prompted a slew of contempt reactions from journalists.

At a March 19 White House briefing, Trump had remarked: “Now, a drug called chloroquine, and some people would add to it, hydroxychloroquine, so chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine … [has] shown very encouraging, very, very encouraging early results.” The president acknowledged that the drug may not “go as planned” and that more testing was needed, but that “we’re going to be able to make that drug available almost immediately.”

“Trump peddles unsubstantiated hope in dark times,” read a March 20 “analysis” by CNN’s Stephen Collinson. Saying Trump was “adopting the audacity of false hope” and embracing “premature optimism,” Collinson charged that “there’s no doubt he overhyped the immediate prospects for the drug” because the FDA had not provided an explicit timeline on approving the drug to treat coronavirus.

“Trump is giving people false hope of coronavirus cures. It’s all snake oil,” read one Washington Post headline. Added the Post’s editorial board: “Trump is spreading false hope for a virus cure — and that’s not the only damage.”

“The most promising answer to the pandemic will be a vaccine, and researchers are racing to develop one,” the paper insisted, although it is not staffed with medical experts. “Mr. Trump’s inappropriate hype has already led to hoarding of hydroxychloroquine and diverted supplies from people with other maladies who need it. His comments are raising false hopes. Rather than roll the dice on an unproven therapy, let’s deposit our trust in the scientists.”

“There are no approved therapies or drugs to treat COVID-19 yet, but the president hypes preliminary chloroquine trials at White House briefing and unproven remedies on Twitter,” the paper wrote, just days before the FDA would approve the drug.

https://twitter.com/seanmdav/status/1279070337037144064?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1279070337037144064%7Ctwgr%5E&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.analyzingamerica.org%2Fhydroxychloroquine-helped-save-coronavirus-patients-study-shows-trump-campaign-hails-fantastic-news%2F

And, NBC News complained, “Trump, promoting unproven drug treatments, insults NBC reporter at coronavirus briefing.”

More from Fox News:

Researchers at the Henry Ford Health System in Southeast Michigan have found that early administration of the drug hydroxychloroquine makes hospitalized patients substantially less likely to die.

The study, published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases, determined that hydroxychloroquine provided a “66% hazard ratio reduction,” and hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin a 71 percent reduction, compared to neither treatment.

In-hospital mortality was 18.1 percent with both drugs, 13.5 percent with just hydroxychloroquine, 22.4 percent with azithromycin alone, and 26.4 percent with neither drug. “Prospective trials are needed” for further review, the researchers note.

Michael Cohen, a Boston Globe columnist, urged networks to stop airing Trump’s coronavirus press briefings because he was spreading “misinformation” about a potential cure.

The New York Times’ Kurt Eichenwald reported that a “Louisiana MD” on the “front lines of the COVID-19 fight” had told him that “Hydroxychloroquine doesn’t work” and that “amateurs who dont [sic] understand research” were driving up demand for the drug. (“Count me skeptical of your source here, Kurt,” Holden wrote.)

Another fake news incident that cost lives was a “massive study” in the “prestigious” medical journal The Lancet in May that blasted HCQ as a “dangerous” drug that could increase the risk of death, which the media seized upon without even questioning it.

But when conservatives did question it, the “study” turned out to use fake data, which caused a rare retraction by the journal.

The medical journal The Lancet on Thursday retracted a large study on the use of hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19 because of potential flaws in the research data. The study, published two weeks ago, found no benefit to the drug — and suggested its use may even increase the risk of death.

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