Veterans Storm Out Of AOC Meeting After She Bashes America

by Sheri Urban

New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez angered veterans so much at a recent event that they walked out after listening to her bash the nation.

The incident happened during a private meeting of community leaders in the Bronx where the representative railed against United States foreign policy, The New York Post reported.

“She knocks the country, she knocks the president. And that’s not what America is about,” Vietnam veteran Silvio Mazzella said.

Another veteran, Anthony Vitaliano, who also worked for the New York Police Department for more than three decades, could not stand it either.

“I just couldn’t hear her BS anymore,” he said in a statement to The Post. “I just got up, got my umbrella in my hand and walked right out.”

AOC held the closed-door meeting with about a dozen members of the board on Wednesday night, marking a rare visit to the Bronx part of her district.

One Middle Eastern board member raised the issue of the conflict in Yemen.

The progressive firebrand slammed the US policy of providing bombs to Saudi Arabia, which has supported Yemen’s government in a brutal civil war, according to attendees. Some blamed her for not including the roles of other nations in explaining the volatile region’s violence.

“Talking about America, that really turned me off completely,” Mazzella, who fought in Vietnam from 1966 – 1968, said.

Earlier, board members complained about problems with the US Postal Service, which regularly misses mail deliveries, and a local Amtrak property that is a magnet for graffiti vandals. CB 11 is a working-class neighborhood on the eastern side of the Bronx covering Allerton, Morris Park, Pelham Gardens and Van Nest. In addition to parts of the Bronx, Ocasio-Cortez’s district includes north-central Queens.

“Did she care about the issues? She wrote them down,” said Vitaliano, 78. “The jury will be out on the local issues.”

She “danced around the whole” question of Columbus Day, for which the neighborhood holds a parade every year, said Vitaliano, who supports creating a day for indigenous people but wants to preserve the treasured Italian-American tradition.